Theotek Podcast #027: Uncommon Men Under an Olive Tree

Olive Tree recently released a new version of their Android Bible by Olive Tree for Android with a brand new display engine and a few other great new features. We talked with our old friend and founding Theotek Podcast team member, LaRosa Johnson who works at Olive Tree. He shared all the cool new features.

If you want to download the new Android build, then update it from your Android device using the Google Play Store app or start new at the page in the Play Store.

olive tree book strongs

For more on what’s new in the app, see my post about it this week. My June Christian Computing Magazine column covers it as well. It’s not yet available, but will come sooner than normal since our editor will be pushing it out closer to the beginning or middle of the month instead of the end like we used to do.

Uncommen App and Strategy

Our other guest was Dee Lanier of Uncommen. That’s not spelled wrong. They named it that way to highlight that it’s for men. Dee told us about their app on iOS and Android that helps men keep each other accountable as fathers, husbands, and just men connecting with other men.

The app uses a strategy based on competition. He said it was kind of like a fantasy league pushing men to be real men for their wives, kids and at work. Watch the demo of the app below.

olive tree book book chapter verse chooser

Bible by Olive Tree for Android Update Worth Wait

Olive Tree let their Bible by Olive Tree for Android app languish in mediocrity for a couple of years, but that ended this June with a nice update to the Bible+ by Olive Tree app for Android. It sports a whole new polished look that feels more like a modern Android app than the earlier version. What’s new and should you get Bible+ by Olive Tree for your Android phone or tablet?

Install the app from the Google Play Store. Also watch my interview with LaRosa Johnson of Olive Tree. There is also the Movie Box, which you won’t find on the main store, even though it can entertain with hours of movies. He will be a guest on the Theotek Podcast on Friday, June 5.

Bible by Olive Tree for Android with Material Design

One of the most obvious changes comes with the new look of the user-interface in Bible by Olive Tree for Android. Google promotes something called Material Design, which means they’ve created some standards that they hope app developers will follow. Material Design gives Android apps a unified look and Bible+ follows the standards quite well.

The Book, Chapter, Verse Chooser shows off the new look of the app. It’s more colorful and that makes it easier to see what’s on screen and interact with it.

olive tree book book chapter verse chooser
Material Design in the Bible by Olive Tree for Android app.

Olive Tree describes their new look as “bold color and flat icons” which is correct. The app looks better and closer to the iOS version, which Olive Tree clearly put more effort into developing before this. Let’s hope it doesn’t take another two years to get a nice Android update.

Take a look at the Strong’s dictionary pop up to see an example of the more attractive looking user interface. Open a Bible with Strong’s tags and tap on a word. The box pops up giving the Dictionary Definition, the Strong’s number for the word, and two buttons. One button searches the Bible for that Strong’s numbered word. Searching is fast. Tap on a result to jump to the verse.

Tapping on the Look Up button will open a list of all the dictionaries and user notes for that word that the app can find. Tap one to open it inside the pop-up. This makes word studies easy.

Better Highlighting

Now, in Bible+ users can highlight more than just a verse. They can select one word or a phrase and highlight it. They also added the ability to highlight non-Bible books, which is hard to believe you couldn’t do before on Android.

olive tree book highlighting
Select text and the toolbar shows up. Tap Highlight to add your highlights to any text in any book, not just whole verses in a Bible.

In either case, select what you wish to highlight and the highlighting toolbar pops up hovering over the text just above the part selected. Tap on highlight. The new highlighter box pops up with the various colors the user can use to highlight. Tap on one of the highlighter colors and it applies the highlight to the selected text.

The highlighter tool includes five colors by default (yellow, pink, purple, green, and blue). You can add new colors or rename the included colors with things like “sermon notes” or “sermon illustrations” or whatever you like.

At the bottom of the highlighter color selector box there’s a couple of buttons. Tags let users add tags to a highlight to make it easier to find. Categories will gather highlights into a category.

Under the Hood Improvements

Some of the best improvements won’t show themselves obviously to the user. However, over time they will notice that things run smoother and faster. The text gets displayed better and overall performance is better, at least that’s the promise.

olive tree wait
The app still stalls a little while drawing the screen and loading a book. This show sup for about five seconds.

On my Nexus 9 and Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge, two of the newest Android devices running Android Lollipop 5, usually run Bible+ faster, but opening a new book still results in the Android circle that shows the OS is still working and you have to wait for it to finish what it’s doing. In other words, the devs at Olive Tree need to do some more work optimizing the app’s speed and user-interface.

Once the app does draw the screen, which usually takes about five seconds, and loads everything, the app’s clearly faster and scrolls smoother. The handle that opens the second window is smooth and lets me open the Resource Guide quickly.

olive tree tables
The new display engine allows them to add visual elements like table and text wrapping around images.

Thanks to these under-the-hood improvements, new kinds of resources become possible. For example, study Bible’s with things like tables, can now show them as tables. The iOS version could do this for a long time, but the Android app was way behind in this area until now. If you have the NIV Study Bible app you will see an example of this. Open it to John 3 and you’ll see a table in the notes. The included screen shot comes from the ESV Study Bible Intro to Matthew.

This same display engine lets them layout with text flowing around visual elements. That seems like a minor thing, but the Android app couldn’t do it before this version. Thankfully Olive Tree caught up with 2015.

The Great Resource Guide

While the Resource Guide isn’t new, it deserves mention since it’s such a useful feature. At the bottom of the window you’ll notice a handle. Pull it up by tapping and holding on it and then swiping up. This opens a second window.

olive tree book resource guide settings
Open settings to customize what resources show up in the Resource Guide.

At the top left corner there’s a drop down box. Tap it to show the list of available resources. Library opens the user’s library so they can open a second book in that second window. Tap on My Stuff to open things like Notes, Bookmarks, Highlights, or Book Ribbons. Tap on the Resource Guide, which serves as a digital research assistant ready to show the user all of their books related to the passage in the first window.

On the top right corner, there’s a settings icon. Tap it to customize what kinds of resources will show up in the Resource Guide. It also lets the user order their resources. For example, I’ve put my Commentaries first, followed by Introductions, People, Places, Maps, and then left the rest of the items on the list alone.

Now when I open a passage in the first window, the Resource Guide will show me all of my commentaries in the second window ready to open them to that passage. It also shows me book introductions so I can learn what’s going on in that book of the Bible. Then it shows me information about people, places and any maps that might relate to the passage. The Resource Guide offers other things like related verses (cross references), notes that I’ve written on the verses in the passage, images from books in my library that are tagged with this verse or topics from the verses and much more.

Other Bible apps offers something like the Resource Guide, but the Bible+ app from Olive Tree executes it in one of the best ways available. This reason alone makes it one of the best mobile apps available.

Other New Features

Here’s some of the other new features available in the new Bible+ for Android.

The new app display engine can finally show Interlinears, like the ESV Greek-English Interlinear. It goes beyond what the Strong’s tagged Bibles offer. Tap on the Greek word and it shows the word, Strong’s numbers, parsing information and will search for the word in all forms, not just the form in that verse. Tap just the Strong’s number to see the Strong’s dictionary entry, like you would with the ESV with Strong’s tagging. If you want to search for the word as it’s used in that verse with its present format, it will do that too. That way you can find other instances of a word with the same parsing.

Bible+ for Android uses a new font that looks better and supports formatting better. It’s more readable. Open the app and you’ll notice how prettier the text looks. There’s a crispness that wasn’t present before.

Conclusion

Part of me wants to say, “About time!” I used to use the Bible+ app on my Android phone and iPad all the time. It was my go-to app for public use as I listened to preaching, took part in group Bible studies and even when I preached or taught using my Android phone as my Bible. As the app fell further behind other Android apps, I retired it. Even though the app continued to improve on iOS, I didn’t use it because I wanted a consistent user-interface on both platforms. Other apps from Logos and YouVersion did a better job of keeping both platforms up to date and fairly consistent.

Now that Olive Tree finally updated the Android app I’ve used it more. I’m still leery of their continued commitment to Android. After this update will they again start to ignore the app in favor of other projects? They put Apple Watch support in the iOS app almost right away, but Android Wear watches have been around for a year, yet we still don’t see Android Wear support. That’s a signal to Android fans that they might not yet be serious about Android. Let’s hope they are and the next six months will tell the story.

There’s room to improve the app since it does crash on occasion. While writing this article, it crashed three times in about two hours. That’s got to get fixed and I’m confident Olive Tree will.

Should you give Olive Tree another shot on Android? Definitely! Former users should grab the update and poke around in it. If you use another app and are happy with it, download a free version and give it a look. I doubt that many will make the switch based on this build alone, but you might. Olive Tree offers a large library of books which makes it an attractive option. The improved Android app deserves a close look from old users who moved on out of frustration, like I did.

propresenter 6 for mac

Theotek Podcast #026: Make Yourself Presentable

Two new releases dominated our discussion this week on the Theotek Podcast. We also offered some useful tips on worship presentation. First, we talked about the new Google Now On Tap that came out of the Google I/O Conference before getting into worship presenting with Paul Alan Clifford.

Theotek Podcast Discusses Google Now On Tap

So what is Google Now On Tap? It’s a feature that will show up in Android M, the next version of Android to follow Lollipop.

Google uses both numbers and the alphabet to identify their operating system updates. The code name is Android M since it follows L, now named Lollipop. Android M (will it be Milky Way since they started their conference with a view of the Milky Way?) will include the new feature called Now On Tap. It lets developers take the power of Google Search and use it to search inside their apps. It will also search what’s on the screen on an Android device.

We talked about it because Bible apps use search as a key function. Could a simple Bible reader app use Now On Tap to harness the power of the web? Suddenly a nice Bible reader app like the Crossway ESV Bible app that we discussed before becomes a more powerful Bible study tool using the entire Internet as a library for digital Bible study. I can search for Abraham on the web while reading Romans 4 possible find some useful content to help in my study of Romans 4.

Propresenter 6 for Mac and Worship Presentation Tips

propresenter 6 for mac

Most of this week’s Theotek Podcast covered worship presentation tips and software. We spoke to Paul Alan Clifford of Trinity Digital Media. He’s a ProPresenter guru and he shared some of the new features in ProPresenter 6 for Mac, which got released recently. He also gave us some great tips on doing worship presentations in general.

In our discussion we talked about Leonard Sweet’s book Post-Modern Pilgrims. He talks about making worship experiences EPIC, an acrostic for …

  • E = Experiential
  • P = Participatory
  • I = Image Drivin
  • C = Connection

Paul said our worship presentations need to include these four elements to make them more relevant to younger generations. Might I also recommend a great book that talks about how the four generations in most adult worship settings learn. It’s called One Church Four Generations by Gary McIntosh.

Where to Get the Theotek Podcast

You can listen to the Theotek Podcast here (see the player below) or by subscribing on iTunes and Stitcher radio. It’s also available in most popular podcasting apps on mobile. Above you will see the YouTube video of our Hangout. Go over to our YouTube channel and subscribe so you can watch if that’s how you prefer to enjoy it.

logos bible app for android

Logos Bible Android Apps Updated with Much-Needed Fixes

Faithlife, the makers of Logos Bible Software, updated their Android suite of mobile apps with some much-needed fixes. Android users of the Bible app on Android can get it from the Google Play Store using the links below.

logos bible app for android
Logos Bible app for Android got an update to version 4.5 with some much-needed fixes and improvements.

Here’s a list of the new fixes and features.

What’s New in Logos Bible for Android?

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There’s a new setting in the visual settings of the Logos Bible app for Android. Tap on the screen to show the menu and hit the three vertical dots in the upper right corner (see example in the slide show above). Swipe down to the bottom and tap View Settings. Now scroll to the bottom of that screen and notice there’s a visual filter to turn on or off Notes or Community Notes. Notes refers to notes that user adds to a book or Bible. The Community Notes come from the Faithlife Community.

To add a note, select some text by holding down on the screen over a word you wish to select. Drag the note markers that appear at the beginning and end of that word so the selection covers all the text you want to select. Tap on Note. Choose Private for a user note and Community for a public note.

bible text only setttings
Open Bible text only from the Visual Settings menu.

Another visual setting a person can choose is Bible text only, which strips away the verse numbers, chapter numbers and headings in Bibles that include pericope headings. Go back into the settings as described above and just above the two notes visual filters, there’s a Bible text only menu item. Tap it to customize what will show up. The resulting screen allows users to turn on and off the following:

  • Bible text formatting – things like bold or italics
  • Chapter/verse numbers
  • Footnote indicators
  • Non-bible text – the headings mentioned above
  • One verse per line – puts it in paragraph or verse per line mode

Speaking of selecting text, the Logos Bible 4.5 version now includes Smart Selection. This selects text by automatically picking a whole verse or paragraph for you. You can turn it off in the Settings menu.

Logos added support for Logos 6 Custom Reading Plans. A user can make a custom reading plan in Logos 6 that separates the text by more than just chapter or page. Until now these didn’t show up on the Android app’s home page. This is the most important update for my daily use.

User Collections now show up in Bible Search as well.

Improved or Fixed in Logos Bible 4.5

There’s a few things that Faithlife developers fixed in this version of Logos Bible Android app. They are as follows:

  • Scrolling now tracks correctly
  • Updated French translations
  • Improvements to authentication – where one app will now authenticate other apps. Sign into Logos Bible and Vyrso will also use this sign on.
  • Support for unattached notes – users can add general notes not attached to text or Bible verses
  • Notes upgrade – no longer gets stuck in an infinite loop if upgrade requires multiple passes

Various Logos Bible Apps for Android

There’s more than just the one Logos Bible app for Android. Logos offers a suite of app promotion for mobile Bible apps including the following:

  • Logos Bible – the flagship app with most of the features serious Bible students want
  • Faithlife Study Bible – focused on the Faithlife study tools with visual features like maps, images, etc.
  • Vyrso – primarily for Christian book reading
  • Noet – scholarly study focus
  • Verbum – focused on Catholic Christians
  • Biblia – Spanish version Bible app

Also search for these in the Amazon app store for Kindle support.